Davide Gerosa

University of Birmingham


Are stellar-mass black-hole binaries too quiet for LISA?

Spoiler alert: this paper is a bit sad.

Stellar-mass black-hole binaries are now detected by LIGO on a weekly basis. It would be really cool if LISA (a future space mission targeting low-frequencies gravitational waves) could see them as well. We could do a lot of cool stuff, in both the astro and the theory side of things. In today’s paper, we try to figure out how easy or hard it will be to extract these signals from the LISA noise. Well, it’s hard. In terms of the minimum signal-to-noise ratio required, we find that this is as high as 15. The number of expected detection becomes discouragingly low unless the detector behaves a bit better at high frequencies or black holes with 100 solar masses start floating around.

Christopher J. Moore, Davide Gerosa, Antoine Klein.
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters 488 (2019) L94–L98.
arXiv:1905.11998 [astro-ph.HE].


Spin alignment and differential accretion in merging black hole binaries

Supermassive black holes in binaries and their accretion discs… Spins align on some timescale, but migration also takes place. Do gas discs have enough time to align the spins? Well, the secret is the mass ratio: light secondaries might prevent primaries from aligning. A great collaboration between gravitational-wave and planet researchers!

Davide Gerosa, Benedetta Veronesi, Giuseppe Lodato, Giovanni Rosotti.
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 451 (2015) 3941-3954.
arXiv:1503.06807 [astro-ph.GA].


Missing black holes in brightest cluster galaxies as evidence for the occurrence of superkicks in nature

Black-hole kicks are powerful. I mean, really powerful. They can even eject supermassive black holes from the heavier galaxies in our Universe. And then these galaxies are left “empty”…

Davide Gerosa, Alberto Sesana.
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 446 (2015) 38-55.
arXiv:1405.2072 [astro-ph.GA].